Grey Bar

The Roosevelt presents The Kingfish featuring Spud McConnell

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The Roosevelt New Orleans, A Waldorf Astoria Hotel, will step back in time to an era of colorful, raucous Louisiana politics when it presents “The Kingfish,” starring Spud McConnell in the one-man depiction of the life and times of famed Louisiana Governor Huey P. Long, by Larry L. King and Ben Z. Grant.

So on August 29th, put on your favorite Seersucker Suit and sip on a Ramos Gin Fizz to celebrate Huey P. Long’s 120th birthday at The Roosevelt Hotel.  Doors to the world-famous Blue Room open at 6:30 p.m., with the performance at 7:00 p.m.  VIP tickets are $80 per person, and general admission tickets are $65 per person, both exclusive of tax and gratuity.  Complimentary parking is available.

McConnell has received national acclaim for his on-stage portrayals of legendary Louisiana politicians and eccentrics, including Long (“The Kingfish”), brother Earl K. Long (“Earl Long in Purgatory”) and Ignatius J. Riley (“A Confederacy of Dunces”).  His career took him to Hollywood while he was featured for three seasons on ABC’s hit television show “Roseanne”.  Today, McConnell is back in Louisiana broadcasting on WWWL 1350.

Authors Ben Z. Grant and Larry L. King show the many sides of Huey Long and reflect when they believe to be his attitudes. They have invented dialogue when illustrating historical events. They have brought Long back from the grave to comment on current or recent politicians and events. They have permitted him to live and discuss his own assassination.  The Kingfish melds fact and fancy.

For reservations please call 504-335-3129 or visit here for online reservations.

 


Pre-Theatre

 

Start your night at the Fountain Lounge with our Pre-Dinner Menu starting at 4:30 p.m. and $35 per person.  The Fountain Lounge at The Roosevelt New Orleans brings a touch of new-world sophistication, while offering subtle nods to the timeless elements of the hotel.  Opened in 1938 under the direction of then-hotel owner Seymour Weiss, the Fountain Lounge was a place where the hip, sociable and fashionable met to enjoy cocktails and small plates in an atmosphere described as “casual and carefree as a night in Paris.”